Aug
14

Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop

by
Lauren Scott

Photoshop CS’s high pass filter is very versatile, and in this tutorial we show you how it can be used for sharpening images

One of the reasons that the High Pass filter technique works so well at sharpening images is because any areas in the image which are not an edge are left untouched.

Sharpening is always the last step in post-processing. This is because the amount of sharpening you need to apply varies according to how you intend to use the photo. Using the High Pass Filter is an easy, simple and effective way to sharpen your images, particularly before sending them to print.

1. Open your image in Photoshop

Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop

2. Copy your image by selecting the background layer and pressing Ctrl + J

Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop

3. Go to Filter > Other > High Pass

Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop

4. Set the radius

The higher the Radius, the more sharpening is applied to the photo. Somewhere in the range of 0.5 to 3.0 is about right, depending on the subject matter and how much you want to sharpen it. It’s usually best to look at the preview and choose a number where the edges are just becoming visible. It might take a bit of experimenting and a few goes to get right, depending on the outcome you’re looking for.

Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop

5. Go to Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation… and set the Saturation to zero. This eliminates any colour fringing

Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop

6. Change the Blending Mode to Overlay

Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop


Sharpen your images using the High-Pass filter in Photoshop

Here you can see the difference after sharpening. You may have to look closely to see the difference – the unsharpened photo is on the left and the sharpened one is on the right. The level of sharpening is often subtle. If you introduce too much, then artefacts become noticeable in the image, seen as lines marking the edge of a dark subject against a light one, such as the horizon. If you want to add more sharpening, you can always add another layer and repeat the process.

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    • Bobby Parker.

      I use this method for my architectural renderings and it works great.

    • Sheikh Aamir

      good i will try next time