Jul
22

A Beginner’s Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

Team Blog
by
Matt Brock

Matt Brock explains the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

Why iPhone Photography?

A Beginner's Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

Image copyright: Matt Brock

Many photographers are starting to use smartphones, particularly iPhones, in addition to  SLRs. A huge benefit of the iPhone over traditional cameras is the ability to quickly point and shoot at times when it would not otherwise be possible.  A frequently-used catchphrase for this is ‘the best camera is the one that’s with you’. Being able to take photographs at any time can provide a huge advantage.

A Beginner's Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

Image copyright: Matt Brock

The other main benefit of the iPhone is the huge range of ‘apps’ available from the App Store. There are apps available on other smartphones too, but the range of photography apps available on the iPhone is particularly impressive. These apps enable photographers to process photos in almost every conceivable way without needing to go near a computer, and also to easily share photos with others via photo sharing sites.

Top Ten iPhoneography Tips

1. Don’t think, just shoot. The iPhone lets you take a photo right now, so don’t regret a missed opportunity.

A Beginner's Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

2. Take multiple shots. It’s quick to shoot on the iPhone, and easy to delete unnecessary photos later.

3. Conceal your intentions. For candid shots, pretend you’re using your iPhone for text messaging – the perfect disguise.

A Beginner's Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

4. Use a better camera app. The standard Camera app is limited, so use a ‘camera replacement’ app.

5. Make your camera app easily accessible. Put your preferred camera app at the bottom of the Home Screen so you can get to it quickly.

A Beginner's Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

6. Use apps to enhance your photos. The App Store is full of incredible photo apps, so experiment with them.

7. Share. Use apps to immediately let people see your photos on Flickr, Tumblr, Instagram, or wherever you prefer.

A Beginner's Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

8. Give feedback. Give feedback on photo sharing sites and you will get plenty back.

9. Stay up to date. Read blogs such as www.iphoneography.com for information on new apps and other iPhoneography news.

A Beginner's Guide to iPhone Photography: part 1

10. Manage your photos. Delete imperfect photos from your Camera Roll, and sync with iPhoto or Aperture to keep your library tidy.

Now you know how, get snapping and check out part 2 tomorrow when Matt share’s with you his top ten iPhone apps…

To read part 2 go to https://news.dphotographer.co.uk/news/uncategorized/a-beginners-guide-to-iphone-photography-part-2/

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    • Pingback: A Beginner’s Guide to iPhone Photography: part 2 | General photography | Digital Photographer()

    • Great play by play Matt. A nice introduction to the world of iPhoneography.

    • Great job Matt! A wonderful introduction to the world of iPhoneography.

    • Pingback: A Beginner’s Guide to iPhone Photography | Matt Brock's Blog()

    • Zack

      Part 0.1: If you really must take photos with your phone don’t buy an iPhone! The iPhone does many things well but photography is not one of them. Buy a phone with a decent sensor, quality lens and flash that works preferably xenon; for example the Nokia N8.

    • Whilst the tech specs of the N8’s camera look much better than the iPhone 4’s on paper, the real-life image quality isn’t actually that much different. I think this is missing the real point, however, which is that mobile photography is primarily about being able to shoot an image almost instantaneously at any time. For other specific situations where very high image quality is required, an SLR is obviously still the appropriate choice.

    • I think Android does the same quality pictures.Check my phonotography set from my site or here , just look me up and comment them.
      Best wishes.

    • Great job Matt!

    • iPhone photography is definitely here to stay. As anyone can see applications like Instagram and Hipstamatic are rising to the top of the app sales and downloads. I am a huge fan of iPhone photography and can’t wait to get my hands on the new iPhone 4S with 8 megapixels to expand my capturing quality that until now has a high standard. You can search for my user name nickkarvounis on Instagram to see examples of my iPhone photography